Chocolate Keeps Your Teeth Health

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The latest research has found that chocolate can prevent damage to the tooth. This was so successful in combating decay that scientists believe are several components that may one day be added to mouthwash or toothpaste.

The study, conducted by researchers at Osaka University in Japan found that parts of cocoa beans, the main ingredient of chocolate, thwart mouth bacteria and tooth decay.

They found that the skin of cocoa beans - the exterior of the bean which usually goes to waste in chocolate production - has anti-bacterial effect on the mouth and can fight effectively against plaque and other harmful agents.

Tooth decay occurs when bacteria in the mouth turns into acid, which damages the surface of the teeth and cause dental caries.

Japanese scientists have discovered that chocolate is less harmful than many other sweet foods, as antibacterial agents in cocoa beans offset high levels of sugar.

After three months, the study found that the rates with a high sugar diet had a 14 hole average compared with only six cavities for those who received skin cocoa beans in their diet.

The researchers now plan to test their findings in humans.

Speaking to the magazine New Scientist, Takashi Ooshima, from Osaka University, say their findings could lead to new treatments for tooth decay.

"It may be possible to use a mouthwash CBH extracts, or supplements for toothpaste."

It could even be put back into the chocolate to make it better for the teeth, he said

"They certainly have an effect but good oral hygiene, rather than eating lots of chocolate, is the way to good healthy teeth."

A spokesman for the British Dental Association said: "If it's true that chocolate does help reduce tooth decay and cavities that can only be a good thing, but you must remember that chocolate contains sugar.

"Our advice remains the same: if people want to eat candy and sweet drinks they should limit it, and visit the dentist regularly."